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Denisefh

? for diabetics

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I hope this is the right forum for this, but it does relate to the heart.

I'm self injecting Arixtra into the abdomen (subQ) each day and though I just started Thursday, it gets more difficult and painful each time. I swear the needle gets longer, duller and fatter each time I use the prefilled syringe.

All the instructions say is "insert" the needle, or "inject" the solution but they don't say how to do it. If I just push it in it doesn't seem to hurt that badly, though the skin bends for a while before the needle actually goes in. Today I tried to sorta poke it in - like a dart - but that hurt even worse (or I didn't let the alcohol dry enough).

Is there a trick? Since I'll have to do this forever, I'd really like to know the easiest way to do it.

Oh yes, yesterday my doctor said that they're thinking of placing a filter/net thing somewhere to prevent future Pulmonary Embolisms. I guess it catches the clots before they can reach the lungs.

She is also concerned about the stress on the heart with the PE, guess it can really do a number on one side (can't remember which).

Any info would be appreciated.

Denise

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Oh my gosh. Please tell me it's a new needle each time you have to inject. Even for subQ you should have a sterile needle. When I do injections at work the best thing to do is look for the bevel on the needle. Yes, there is one. And the bevel goes up (so you can see the opening). If you try to poke it in bevel down or sideways you're not piercing the skin with the sharp tip. Ouch! Hope that helps.

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Denise it would seem this drug is used commonly in orthopaedic patients after surgery to prevent clotting and in heart patients but usually patients who require further blood thinning treatment are put on warfarin after about six days. here is something I found searching about.

 

Method of administration

 

 

Arixtra is administered by deep subcutaneous injection while the patient is lying down. Sites of administration should alternate between the left and the right anterolateral and left and right posterolateral abdominal wall. To avoid the loss of medicinal product when using the pre-filled syringe do not expel the air bubble from the syringe before the injection. The whole length of the needle should be inserted perpendicularly into a skin fold held between the thumb and the forefinger; the skin fold should be held throughout the injection. information on Atrxtra injesctions

 

more info

 

Hope it is of some assistance for you, God bless. :signs007[1]:

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Thanks.

Irene, I'm confused (nothing new there) if by bevel you mean that the needle is slanted then mine are. But I don't understand how the bevel (if that's what it is) wouldn't always automatically be what goes in first because of the slant. I do use fresh needles and syringes each time because they're prefilled and prepackaged, with automatic needle retraction after the injection. It's just in my mind that they seem to be duller and fatter each time.

Gordon, your info is interesting. I'll always have to be on this, however, because I've been throwing clots even though I've been on Coumadin for almost a year and a half (at or above therapeutic levels). They say that obviously Coumadin for some reason doesn't work in me and thus these shots.

Denise

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I guess it depends on how you're inserting the needle. In some cases (I've seen it done for flu shots) the needle is inserted at 90 degree angle to the skin. For others it's at a 45 degree angle which is where the bevel up becomes important. I always do 45 degrees for injections and even less when I do sub Q since bird skin is so thin and delicate. I have to lay the needle almost flat against the skin and slip it in a tiny bit to form the "bubble" of fluid. Same with drawing blood. But that's not what you're doing. If you go straight in the bevel shouldn't matter. Do you know what gauge is used? It should say 25 or 27, something like that. The higher the number, the smaller the needle.

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It didn't say on the box or syringes but from what I found on the internet it is a 27 gauge. I must be turning into a wimp.

And it's supposed to be injected at a 90 degree, which I'm assuming is straight in.

Thanks for the info,

Denise

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It didn't say on the box or syringes but from what I found on the internet it is a 27 gauge. I must be turning into a wimp.

And it's supposed to be injected at a 90 degree, which I'm assuming is straight in.

Thanks for the info,

Denise

Denise I've been a diabetic for over 20 teatrs and inject insulin 3 times a day. I need to ask an indelicate question, do you have love handles? If so then the proper place to inject yourself is a little to the left or right of your stomache. This are has less sensation and more subcutaneous tissue. You should alternate sides every 5 to 7 days. Once in a while, no matter how careful you are you'll hit a nerve and it hurts, but as a rule I don't hurt when I inject. Good luck, it will get better as time goes on. Jim

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As I was googling "bevel needles" for an image to show you earlier I found one site that shows where to do the injection. It had a little drawing of the appropriate areas and even had photos of the person pinching body parts and injecting. Then I did a copy of the site address. www.pegasys.com/injecting/ pegasys-vials.aspx

 

I think that's all of the address or maybe it's too much stuff. Anyway, if you google (images) the bevel needles and go to page 4, look for the pegasys deal. There it also says you can inject at 90 degrees or 45. Kind of interesting. (are we allowed to put web site addresses here? I can't remember)

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Denise,

 

You are probably using much longer needles that used for insulin injection. Some needles are made sharper than others and the thinner the needle the less pain. Don't follow my example but I will use the same syringe for a week at two shots a day. I've never used prep before a shot and when done I just put the cover back on and put it in the fridge with the insulin.

 

I think that you will also find that some parts of your stomach are more sensitive that other parts. It's not a good idea to favor these areas and you should keep rotating the site. A quick poke is what I do but sometimes I'll hit a very sensitive area that causes a lot of pain. You just have to get used to it and it will take a while.

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One of her problems with this stuff is Gilbert it is very much like injecting Heparin and it stings like hell if I am correct. Like Heparin it is an anti-coagulant, this particular drug is usually given to orthopaedic patients after major surgery like a new hip joint or arm or knee etc. I have put two links on my original reply to Denise, sadly these injections don't come pain free, they are even likely to leave bruising where the injection was given. There is also a danger of internal bleeding when using this drug, so strict guidelines must be followed and regular checks and Kidney screening are required, I think. Check the two links on my original reply to Denise. :signs007[1]:

 

Usually patients are taken off this drug and put on warfarin after a shortish period of around 6 days to a week. But Denise has problems with drug reactions and interactions so I guess this is why she is to be kept on this one, God bless Denise I am so sorry that you must have to endure this discomfort for the rest of d that has to be good.

 

:signs007[1]:

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I really appreciate all the advice, experience and links (yes Irene, links are welcomed here). Gordon, you're right the stuff does sting, but the worse part is the sticking in of the needle. I need 7.5 mg of the stuff, I don't know how much volume that is but it seems like it's a fairly fat syringe. I did read that it is better to inject slowly, lol I've been just pushing the plunger down as fast as I could to get it over with.

 

Gilbert, these needles are only 1/2 inch long so I shouldn't complain about that.

 

Jim, every time I'm going to give myself the injection I'm going to think about you having to do it THREE times a day. I can't believe how you can do that, but I guess we do what we have to do in order to live. It also helps to know that sometimes a nerve can be hit and so that won't happen all the time. And, yes I do have love handles, lol a bit too much but I guess it's finally coming in handy.

 

I'm going to try not to focus on the shots too much (I dread them before I give them, then worry all day about the next day's one).

 

I read somewhere that it's best to give in during inhalation or exhalation but darned if I can remember which. :blink:

Guess I'll try one way today and the other tomorrow.

 

Thanks to all of you, it really helps to hear from those that either give injections to themselves or to others (be they skin, furred or feathered). That's one of the great things about a Heart Forum like this one, there are diverse people to draw from for various subjects.

 

Denise

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Sadly Denise these injections are always going to be painful and like Heparin it stings like hell for a minute or two, diabetic injections are painless or mine are anyway. When I was on heparin I found it uncomfortable and I was black and blue from it. My stomach was a mess, I didn't mind the actual injection it was as soon as the stuff went in and boy it stung like crazy. But it is much better than having a clot that moves into the lung or heart and kills you.

 

God bless and boy pulmonary clots are usually terribly painfull to experience. Our prayer are with you Denise and you are always in our thoughts.

 

:common076[1]:

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As for the 7.5 mg of medicine - it depends on the strength. On a typical bottle of meds it will give the strength: something like 2mg/ml (Ivermectin) or 50mg/ml (kid's Amoxicillin). You can see it would make a big difference in how much fluid is actually there. If you had to take Ivermectin (never will unless you happen to be a horse) you'd be using 3.75 ml (or cc's). If it was Amoxi it would only be 0.15ml, just a couple of drops. Sometimes it's better not to know how much is going in. It's just too creepy. I never look when I get a shot. I don't mind having something sucked out of my body - like blood - but I don't like to see things pushed into my body (talking about needles here).

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