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kalip

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About kalip

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  • Birthday 12/20/1954

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    Jogging, Reading, Surfing the Internet , Meditation and travelling.

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    Suffered a heart attack in October 2001, Cardiologist prescribed, Aspirin, Simvastatin, and Coreg, all of which I am still using. Had two CYPHER® Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stents inserted in my LAD artery in June 2004. Go jogging and walking on mornings from 5:00 am 5 days a week (Mondays to Fridays 8 km a day)
  1. Is it safe to go vegan in older age? The diet takes vegetarianism to the extreme and poses a risk for nutrient deficiency. But it does offer health benefits. If tofu turkey and meatless meatloaf are on your holiday menu this year, you may have made the switch to a vegetarian diet, eliminating at least some animal protein. But how much animal protein can you safely cut out of your diet? Vegetarian diet benefits Among the many types of vegetarian diets, three are particularly common: a pescatarian diet allows seafood; a lacto-ovo diet allows dairy products and eggs; finally, a vegan diet allows no seafood, dairy, or other animal products. All of these approaches typically include lots of fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and healthy oils. These plant-based foods contain several healthy components: a wide variety of antioxidants, which have anti-inflammatory properties that are linked to better health lots of fibre, which helps prevent constipation, lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol, and controls blood sugar and weight low saturated fat compared with a non-vegetarian diet. Compared with meat-containing diets, the health benefits of all vegetarian diets are well documented: lower rates of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The picture isn't completely straightforward: a study published Sept. 4, 2019, by The BMJ found that along with lower rates of heart attacks, vegetarians had higher rates of haemorrhagic (bleeding) stroke, compared with meat eaters. The increase equalled about three more cases of haemorrhagic stroke per 1,000 people over 10 years. Most other studies have not identified such a risk. Vegan diet benefits and challenges If plant-based foods are generally healthier than animal-based foods, should you consider a vegan diet, banishing all animal products? It seems like something to consider, with the increasing amount of vegan foods now sold in grocery stores and restaurants. Whether a vegan diet has even greater benefits than a less restrictive vegetarian diet is unclear. "Because the vegan diet is restrictive, it can be a challenge to maintain over the long term," says Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital. A study published in April 2019 in The Journal of Nutrition found that a vegan diet slightly outperformed a pescatarian diet and a lacto-ovo diet when it came to the amount of antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids in the blood, and that a vegan diet significantly outperformed diets with meat. However, this is just one study. "Most studies don't separate vegan and vegetarian diets, so we don't have a lot of evidence comparing one vegetarian diet to the other," says McManus. A vegan diet also comes with health risks, especially for older adults, although you can take action to counteract those risks. In particular, McManus notes, when you cut out animal products, you may come up short on certain nutrients: Calcium. Calcium is important to many functions, especially bone, dental, heart, nerve, and blood health. Protein. We need protein to build strong muscles, bones, and skin — particularly as we age and lose muscle and bone mass and have a harder time healing from wounds. Vitamin B12. This vitamin comes only from animal-based foods. B12 is crucial to our DNA, red blood cell formation, new cell growth, glucose metabolism, and maintaining our nervous system and thinking skills. In addition, you may have trouble getting enough calories on a highly restricted diet. If you don't give your body enough fuel, you may become tired or malnourished. Avoiding deficiencies "You have to be selective when choosing a plant-based diet to ensure that you get enough calories and nutrients," McManus says. Here's how to avoid the potential pitfalls of a vegan diet — or, for that matter, any other type of vegetarian diet: Avoid calcium deficiency. Eat plant-based foods that are rich in calcium: almonds, dark leafy greens (kale, spinach), figs, tofu, and oranges. A medium-sized orange has about 50 milligrams (mg) of calcium; a cup of cooked collard greens has 268 mg of calcium. Aim for 1,000 to 1,200 mg of calcium per day. Get enough protein. Eat protein-rich plant foods: soy products (tofu, tempeh, and edamame), legumes (beans, lentils), nuts (walnuts, almonds), chia seeds, and spirulina (blue or green algae). For example, a cup of canned navy beans has 20 grams of protein. Chia seeds have about 4.5 grams of protein per ounce, and sunflower seeds have about 6 grams per ounce. You need about 7 grams of protein daily for every 20 pounds of body weight. Avoid vitamin B12 deficiency. Try B12-enriched vegan foods such as fortified plant milks (like almond or soy milk) or fortified cereals. McManus says you may need to take a B12 supplement while on a vegan diet. We also advise that your doctor check your blood level of vitamin B12 regularly. How should you start? Get the okay from your doctor before starting a vegan diet, and then seek advice from a registered dietitian, who can tailor an eating plan to your nutritional needs. Combine plant food sources for the maximum amount of vitamins and nutrients. Soups, salads, and smoothies with lots of different kinds of foods will help you maximize calories and nutrients. And by all means, take it slowly. "Get rid of red meat, and then poultry, and then dairy products and fish," McManus says, "But don't feel that you have to eliminate all of them at once." https://www.health.harvard.edu/ kalip
  2. Healthy habits 'deliver extra disease-free decade' Women can gain 10 and men seven years of life free of cancer, heart problems and type-2 diabetes from a healthy lifestyle, a study in the BMJ suggests. They must exercise regularly, drink in moderation only, have a healthy weight and good diet and not smoke. The US research is based on 111,000 people tracked for more than 20 years. Lead author Dr Frank Hu, of Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston, said the study had "a positive message for the public". "They gain not just more years of life but good years through improved lifestyle choices." What is a healthy lifestyle? At the age of 50, study participants were asked if they met at least four of these five criteria: never smoking a healthy, balanced diet 30 minutes of moderate or vigorous activity every day a body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 24.9 no more alcohol than a small glass of wine a day for women and a pint of beer for men Women who said they met four out of five lived an average of another 34 years free of cancer, cardiovascular disease (such as heart attack and stroke) and type-2 diabetes - more than 10 years longer than those who did not. For healthy men, it meant another 31 years of disease-free life - more than seven years extra than unhealthy men could expect. Why the difference between women and men? It may be linkMen who smoked more than 15 cigarettes a day and obese men and women (with a BMI of more than 30) had the lowest disease-free life expectancy, the study found. But some things were true for both sexes - not only did a healthy lifestyle reduce the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes, it also improved survival if men and women were diagnosed with any of the diseases. "The benefits add up for men and women," Dr Hu said. Why focus on these diseases? Cancer, cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes are three of the most common diseases in old age. They are also closely linked to people's lifestyles. Being obese or overweight, for example, is thought to be linked to 13 different types of cancers, including breast, bowel, kidney, liver and oesophagus. ed to the fact women live longer than men on average. Cancer Research UK has calculated that four in 10 cancers can be prevented by people changing aspects of their lifestyle, such as cutting down on processed meat, eating more fibre in their diet and protecting their skin in the sun. Could other factors play a role? This was a large, observational study, so it can't conclude these lifestyle factors were directly responsible for extending life free of disease. It did try to account for other factors, however, such as family medical history, ethnic background and age, which could have had an impact on the results. The research team also had to rely on people giving them information on their food intake, their exercise habits and even their height and weight, which is not always accurate. Most of the participants in the study, involving more than 73,000 women and 38,000 men, were white health professionals. https://www.bbc.com/news/health kalip
  3. Running your first marathon ‘makes you four years younger’ in heart health Running a marathon for the first time can reverse key markers of ageing by four years, a British study has found. The research on novice runners who tackled the London Marathon found they experienced a significant reduction in artery stiffness and blood pressure – cutting their chance of heart attacks and strokes. Scientists said the changes were equivalent to a four year reduction in vascular age. The greatest benefits were seen among those who were older, male and slower runners. Researchers from University College London and Barts Health NHS Trust tracked 138 healthy people who ran the London Marathon for the first time in 2016 or 2017, Participants had been running for less than two hours a week before they began training, mostly following a beginner’s plan consisting of around three runs a week. After six months of training, scans found major improvements in their blood pressure and arterial stiffness. On average systolic and diastolic blood pressure dropped by 4mmHg and 3mmHg respectively. Stiffness of the arteries indicates damage to the blood vessels, and is a key predictor of heart and circulatory problems in later life. Arteries normally stiffen with age, but experts said exercise could reverse or limit the damage. Among participants, some measures of arterial flexibility increased by nine per cent. The study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, only included healthy participants. Experts said even more benefit might be seen in those with higher blood pressure and stiffer arteries. Lead researcher Dr Charlotte Manisty said:“Our study shows it is possible to reverse the consequences of aging on our blood vessels with real-world exercise in just six months. “These benefits were observed in overall healthy individuals across a broad age range and their marathon times are suggestive of achievable exercise training in novice participants.” The average running time for those in the group was 5.4 hours for women and 4.5 hours for men. Expert said this suggested a training schedule of six to 13 miles per week. Dr Manisty said signing up for a major health challenge could be a good way to make significant changes in health. “Making a goal-oriented exercise training recommendation – such as signing up for a marathon or fun-run – may be a good motivator for our patients to keep active. “Our study highlights the importance of lifestyle modifications to slow the risks associated with aging, especially as it appears to never be too late as evidenced by our older, slower runners.” NHS guidance says all adults should get 150 minutes of exercise each week – such as a 30 minute brisk walk five times a week. Commenting on the British Heart Foundation-funded study, its Associate Medical Director Professor Metin Avkiran said: “The benefits of exercise are undeniable. Keeping active reduces your risk of having a heart attack or stroke and cuts your chances of an early death. “As the old mantra goes, if exercise were a pill it would be hailed as a wonder drug. “Setting yourself a goal – such as training for a marathon – is a great way to stay motivated and follow through on your New Year health resolutions. “But you don’t need to train for a marathon to reap the benefits. More is usually better, but every bit counts.” https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/ kalip
  4. AI 'outperforms' doctors diagnosing breast cancer Artificial intelligence is more accurate than doctors in diagnosing breast cancer from mammograms, a study in the journal Nature suggests. An international team, including researchers from Google Health and Imperial College London, designed and trained a computer model on X-ray images from nearly 29,000 women. The algorithm outperformed six radiologists in reading mammograms. AI was still as good as two doctors working together. Unlike humans, AI is tireless. Experts say it could improve detection. How good is it? The current system in the NHS uses two radiologists to analyse each woman's X-rays. In rare cases where they disagree, a third doctor assesses the images. In the research study, an AI model was given anonymised images, so that the women could not be identified. Unlike the human experts, who had access to the patient's history, AI had only the mammograms to go on. The results showed that the AI model was as good as the current double-reading system of two doctors. And it was actually superior at spotting cancer than a single doctor. Compared to one radiologist, there was a reduction of 1.2% in false positives, when a mammogram is incorrectly diagnosed as abnormal. There was also a reduction of 2.7% in false negatives, where a cancer is missed. Dominic King from Google Health said: "Our team is really proud of these research findings, which suggest that we are on our way to developing a tool that can help clinicians spot breast cancer with greater accuracy." Most of the mammograms came from Cancer Research UK's OPTIMAM dataset collected from St George's Hospital London, the Jarvis Breast Centre in Guildford and Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge. It takes over a decade of training as a doctor and specialist to become a radiologist, capable of interpreting mammograms. Reading X-rays is vital but time-consuming work, and there is an estimated shortage of more than 1,000 radiologists across the UK. Will AI take over from humans? No. It took humans to design and train the artificial intelligence model. This was a research study, and as yet the AI system has not been let loose in the clinic. Even when it is, at least one radiologist would remain in charge of diagnosis. But AI could largely do away with the need for dual reading of mammograms by two doctors, easing pressure on their workload, say researchers. Prof Ara Darzi, report co-author and director of the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Imperial Centre, told the BBC: "This went far beyond my expectations. It will have a significant impact on improving the quality of reporting, and also free up radiologists to do even more important things." Women aged between 50 and 70 are invited for NHS breast screening every three years - those who are older can ask to be screened. The use of AI could eventually speed up diagnosis, as images can be analysed within seconds by the computer algorithm. Sara Hiom, director of cancer intelligence and early diagnosis at CRUK, told the BBC: "This is promising early research which suggests that in future it may be possible to make screening more accurate and efficient, which means less waiting and worrying for patients, and better outcomes." Helen Edwards, from Surrey, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 44, before she was eligible for screening. She required surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but has been cancer-free for more than a decade. She was a patient representative on the CRUK panel which had to decide whether to grant Google Health permission to use the anonymised breast cancer data. Helen told the BBC: "Initially I was a bit concerned about what Google might do with the data, but it is stripped of all identifiers. "In the long term this can only benefit women. "Artificial intelligence machines don't get tired... they can work 24/7 whereas a human being can't do that, so to combine the two is a great idea." https://www.bbc.com/news/health kalip
  5. 'Intermittent Fasting' Diet Could Boost Your Health Here comes the new year, and with it hordes of folks looking for ways to fulfill resolutions to eat healthy. Intermittent fasting is a legitimate option they might want to consider, claims a new review in the Dec. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "The state of the science on intermittent fasting has evolved to the point that it now can be considered as one approach, with exercise and healthy food, to improving and maintaining health as a lifestyle approach," said senior author Mark Mattson, a neuroscientist with Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. There are two main ways to adopt intermittent fasting into your life, Mattson said: Daily time-restricted feeding gives you a narrow window during which you can eat, usually 6 to 8 hours each day. 5:2 intermittent fasting requires that people only eat one moderate-sized meal on two days each week. When people are fasting, they are slowly burning through the glucose stored in their liver, Mattson explained. The liver holds about 700 calories of glucose. "It takes 10 to 12 hours to use the liver's energy stores," Mattson said. "Then what happens is, fats are used for energy." This process is called "metabolic switching," and the three-meals-a-day eating pattern favored by Americans doesn't allow their bodies to run through their liver's energy stores and make the switch to fat-burning, Mattson said. In the new paper, Mattson and colleagues summarised the current scientific evidence. Studies show that intermittent fasting can: Stabilise blood sugar levels, increase resistance to stress, and suppress inflammation. Decrease blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and improve resting heart rate. Improve brain health and memory. "If you're thinking of intermittent fasting as a fad diet, I think it's actually a pretty legitimate option," said Hannah Kittrell, a registered dietitian and manager of the Mount Sinai PhysioLab in New York City, a nutrition and exercise physiology clinic. "The reason for that is it's not completely cutting out any food groups," said Kittrell, who wasn't part of the study. "It's not telling you don't eat carbs, don't eat fat. It's just modulating when you're eating food." Kittrell said her lab evaluates different diets by looking at the evolutionary, historical and biological basis for them, and intermittent fasting passes all three tests. "There's an evolutionary basis in the sense that hunter-gatherers essentially followed an intermittent fasting diet because food was scarce. They wouldn't necessarily know the next time they'd eat," she said. The metabolic switch described by Mattson reflects the biological basis of intermittent fasting, and history is full of examples of humans engaging in fasting, Kittrell said. "It's been used a lot for medical and religious reasons," Kittrell said. "Ramadan is a great example of prolonged intermittent fasting." In the paper, Mattson lays out a couple of sample prescriptions for incorporating fasting into your daily life. People who want to try time-restricted feeding could limit themselves to a 10-hour feeding period five days a week for the first month, then bring the period down to 8 and then 6 hours in subsequent months. The goal would be to achieve a 6-hour feeding period seven days a week, the researchers wrote. Or people could start out by fasting one day a week, with one meal on that day of 1,000 calories, and extend that to two days a week by the second month. The goal would be a single 500-calorie meal on two days each week. Mattson and Kittrell warn that you'll likely be uncomfortable as your body adapts to your new eating pattern. "This is very similar to exercise programs where someone who is sedentary, they take a month or two to get in shape while their organ systems adapt to the exercise," Mattson said. It can take between a few weeks to a couple of months for someone to get comfortable with intermittent fasting, Mattson and Kittrell said. "If someone typically eats breakfast and tomorrow they don't eat breakfast, they're going to be hungry and irritable as it gets towards lunchtime," Mattson said. "That will be gone after two weeks to a month, if they stick with it. That's a very important practical aspect." Don't expect immediate results, either -- it can take a few weeks before your body adapts to the point where you'll start dropping pounds and experiencing improved health indicators, Mattson said. Participants also must keep in mind that fasting doesn't give them free license to eat whatever they want, Kittrell added. "Obviously, you're still going to want to follow a healthy diet," Kittrell said. "It's not like you can eat only fast food but because you're doing intermittent fasting you'll be healthy." Although Kittrell considers intermittent fasting a reasonable diet option, she said there's still a lot to learn about it. For example, studies show that some people respond better to fasting than others, though the reasons why aren't yet understood, she said. "I think it shows promise, but there's still a lot of work to be done before you can say that intermittent fasting is 100% safe and effective for everybody to follow," Kittrell said. Mattson, who's been fasting for 20 years himself, said there are certain types of people for whom he wouldn't recommend the practice -- children, the elderly and people who already have very low body weight. He agrees with Kittrell that more research needs to be done regarding the health potential of fasting. For one thing, there's a strong argument to be made that intermittent fasting might improve cancer treatment, Mattson said. "It turns out cancer cells typically only use glucose as a food source. They cannot use fats," Mattson said. "If you hit them with chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation when the person is fasting, then their cancer cells are more easily killed." There are multiple trials ongoing to see if fasting could help treat cancer, Mattson noted. https://consumer.healthday.com/ kalip
  6. Carbohydrates and Cholesterol Levels Not all carbohydrates are equal -- especially when it comes to their effect on cholesterol. Some carbohydrates raise cholesterol, while others lower it. You find carbohydrates in breads, cereals, grains, milk, yogurt, fruits, vegetables, and foods that contain added sugars. All carbs are converted into glucose -- which is also known as blood sugar -- in the body and carbs can be used immediately for energy or stored for later use. Research suggests that the quantity and type of carbohydrates consumed can affect cholesterol. Cholesterol and Triglycerides Cholesterol is in the fats in your blood. High cholesterol is the build-up of these fats, which can lead to heart disease or stroke. Two types of cholesterol exist: LDL, which is also known as low-density lipoprotein and HDL, which is also known as high-density lipoprotein. LDL is the "bad" cholesterol, because it causes a build-up of plaque in the arteries. HDL is the "good" cholesterol, because it helps the body get rid of excess LDL in the blood by carrying it away from the organs to the liver, so that it can be removed. Triglycerides are another type of fat found in the blood, and high triglyceride levels also increase the risk for heart disease. Research on Carbs and Cholesterol Carbohydrate consumption from refined carbohydrates that are high in sugar and low in fibre such as cookies and cakes, is associated with lower levels of HDL and higher levels of LDL and triglycerides, which is associated with an increased risk for heart disease. Very high carbohydrate intakes of more than 60 percent of total calories -- along with excess sugar consumption -- are associated with an increase in triglycerides, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. A 2005 OmniHeart study by Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions compared three diets that emphasised either protein, monounsaturated fat or carbohydrate and found that the protein and monounsaturated fat diets were more effective in reducing the risk factors for heart disease than the high-carbohydrate diet. Breaking Down the Carbohydrates A food's glycaemic index -- which is how fast it increases blood sugar -- may affect your cholesterol. The glycaemic index of a food depends upon a handful of factors, including the type of starch, fibre content and fat content of that food. For example, a refined or processed food such as white bread, has a higher glycaemic index than whole-wheat bread. Additionally, ripe foods tend to have more sugar, while lower fat foods digest faster and cause blood sugar to rise more rapidly, causing them to have a higher glycaemic index. In general, whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables are not only healthy but also have a low glycaemic index. Women who eat a high-glycaemic index diet are more than twice as likely to develop heart disease, according to a 2010 study published in the "Archives of Internal Medicine." Soluble fibre Plays a Role Although refined carbohydrates may raise your cholesterol, healthier carbohydrates with whole grains and fibre can help lower your cholesterol. The beneficial effects of a low-glycaemic diet that contains whole grains may because of its high-fibre content. In particular, soluble fibre has been shown to block cholesterol and fats from absorption, thus lowering the LDL cholesterol. Foods high in soluble fibre include kidney beans, oatmeal, barley, pears, apples and prunes. Aim for five to 10 grams of soluble fibre each day to lower your total cholesterol and your LDL cholesterol. For example, it is possible to meet this goal if you have half a cup of oatmeal for breakfast, half a cup of kidney beans for lunch, one apple for a snack and one medium artichoke with dinner. The Takeaway To improve your cholesterol, eat only a moderate amount of carbohydrates. Everyone has individual requirements, but it can be helpful to have less than 60 percent of your calories come from carbohydrates. Choose carbohydrates that have whole grains, are high in fibre and low in sugar, and include fruits and vegetables. Try replacing unhealthy, high-glycaemic carbohydrates -- such as chips or cookies -- with either whole grains or healthy fats, such as nuts or guacamole. https://www.livestrong.com/ kalip
  7. Cholesterol levels in young adults can predict heart disease risk A recent study investigates the relationship between cholesterol levels in young adulthood and cardiovascular risk in later life — with interesting recommendations for further research. Research has already well documented that high cholesterol levels can lead to heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States, and stroke, the fifth leading cause of death. Cholesterol is a fatty substance that the liver and foods we eat, such as eggs, cheese, and certain meat products produce. Cholesterol is necessary for the body to function. However, too much "bad" cholesterol, which is also called low-density lipoprotein (LDL), can clog the arteries with a fatty build-up, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, or peripheral artery disease. Scientists have also linked high total cholesterol to overweight, lack of exercise, smoking, and alcohol consumption. More than 12% of adults in the U.S. aged 20 years and over have total cholesterol levels above 240 milligrams per decilitre (mg/dl), which doctors consider high. Of children and adolescents aged 6–19 years, some 7% have high total cholesterol. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is "good" cholesterol and helps to sweep LDL from the arteries back to the liver, which removes it from the body. A long look at lipids A new, comprehensive study, appearing in The Lancet, follows almost 400,000 people in 19 countries for up to 43.5 years (1970–2013). The findings shine a spotlight on the link between bad cholesterol (non-HDL) levels in people under 45 years of age and the long-term risk of heart disease and stroke. Set apart from previous studies, this observational and modelling study, which looked at individual level data, suggests that elevated non-HDL cholesterol levels at a younger age can predict cardiovascular risk at 75 years of age. The study used data from 38 studies carried out in the U.S., Europe, and Australia. Of the nearly 400,000 individuals that the study followed, none had cardiovascular disease at the start. The scientists tracked the participants over decades and took details of any heart disease event, fatal or otherwise, or stroke. In total, there were 54,542 incidents of heart disease, fatal or non-fatal, and stroke. When researchers analysed the data for all age groups and both sexes, they saw that the risk of heart disease or stroke dropped continuously as non-HDL levels dropped. In fact, those with the lowest non-HDL levels, — which the scientists defined as 2.6 millimoles (mmol) non-HDL cholesterol per litre — had the least risk. The highest long-term risks of heart and artery disease were in those younger than 45 years old. "This increased risk in younger people could be due to the longer exposure to harmful lipids in the blood," says Prof. Barbara Thorand, of the German Research Centre for Environmental Health in Neuherberg. Study suggests early intervention vital The study confirmed that the level of non-HDL and HDL cholesterol in the blood played a significant part in predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease over time. Researchers used data to create a model for people aged 35–70 years that could estimate the chances of a heart event by age 75 years. It factored in @@@, age, non-HDL levels, and cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure, BMI, diabetes, and smoking status. It also examined how much one could lower risk if non-HDL cholesterol levels were a hypothetical 50% lower. Using this approach, the researchers saw the most significant reduction in risk in the youngest age group. As an example, a male under 45 years of age has starting levels of non-HDL cholesterol of between 3.7–4.8 mmol per litre and at least two risk factors for cardiovascular disease; if the individual was to halve their levels of non-HDL cholesterol, they could reduce the risk from 16% to 4%. A female with the same factors could reduce their risk from around 29% to 6%. Using the same levels of non-HDL cholesterol in individuals of 60 years or more, males could reduce risk from 21% to 10%, and females from 12% to 6%. The researchers suggest that intensive efforts to lower non-HDL cholesterol levels could reverse early signs of blocked arteries, which is known as atherosclerosis. However, there was no clarity on how much slightly increased or seemingly normal cholesterol levels affected cardiovascular risk over a person's lifetime or at what level treatment recommendations should occur, especially in younger adults. "Our estimates suggest that halving non-HDL cholesterol levels may be associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular events by the age of 75 years and that this reduction in risk is larger the sooner cholesterol levels are reduced." Co-author Prof. Stefan Blankenberg "The risk scores currently used in the clinic to decide whether a person should have lipid-lowering treatment only assess the risk of cardiovascular disease over 10 years, and so may underestimate lifetime risk, particularly in young people," notes the study's co-author, Prof. Stefan Blankenberg. The authors say future research is needed to understand whether early intervention in younger people with low 10-year risk but high lifetime risk would have more benefits than later intervention. A limitation of the study is that it may not apply to all regions or ethnic groups because its focus was on high income countries. High cholesterol has no symptoms, and many people are unaware that they have high levels; however, doctors can check levels with a simple blood test. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ kalip
  8. Fatty Diets Tied to Leading Cause of Vision Loss in Seniors - Diets heavy in red meat and fatty foods could help spur a leading cause of vision loss in older Americans, new research suggests. The study found that people who ate more typical Western diets were three times more likely to develop an eye condition that robs you of your central vision -- late-stage age-related macular degeneration. "What you eat seems to be important to your vision, and to whether or not you have vision loss later in life," said study lead author Amy Millen. She's an associate professor in the department of epidemiology and environmental health at the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions, in Buffalo, N.Y. "People know that diet influences cardiovascular risk and the risk of obesity, but the public may not know that diet can affect vision loss," Millen said. Age-related macular degeneration occurs when a part of the eye called the macula is damaged. Sometimes this happens when deposits called drusen grow on the macula. Or it can occur when new blood vessels keep forming and leak blood, scarring the macula, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Genetics and smoking are known risk factors for age-related macular degeneration. The study included almost 1,300 people from a nationally representative sample. Most did not have macular degeneration. There were 117 who had early AMD, and 27 had late. All of the study participants completed surveys about their diets twice during the 18-year study. The researchers sorted the foods into 29 categories to measure the quality of the diet. They found that people who ate a more Western diet were much more likely to develop late-stage AMD. Foods linked to a higher risk included: Red and processed meats Fats, such as margarine and butter High-fat dairy Fried foods. "Diet is one way you might be able to modify your risk of vision loss from age-related macular degeneration," Millen said, especially if you have a family history of the disease. She noted that since the study was observational, it couldn't prove that eating healthy foods would reduce the risk of AMD, but she said it did show the foods you probably don't want to eat often. Dr. Avnish Deobhakta, an ophthalmologist at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in New York City, wasn't involved with the study, but said he wasn't surprised by the findings. "This study shows what we've suspected. A diet high in fatty foods, processed meats and refined grains makes the more severe form of macular degeneration more likely," Deobhakta said. Both Millen and Deobhakta said inflammation caused by a less healthy diet and stress on the cells in the eyes (oxidative stress) are likely behind the increased risk. "The eyes are a sentinel for the rest of the body. In the tiny blood vessels of the eyes, even small changes that you would not otherwise notice in other organs, you will notice in the eyes," Deobhakta said. So can you make up for a lifetime of eating poorly? That's not known. But both experts said that a healthy diet -- full of vegetables (especially dark, leafy greens) and fruits and fatty fish -- contains important nutrients for eye health, including lutein and zeaxanthin. "It's difficult to switch the way you eat overnight, but this is almost certainly a decades-long process, so try to slowly move toward more virtuous behaviour with food. Try to supplement your current diet with more leafy vegetables and increase your consumption of fish," Deobhakta said. And both experts strongly advised no smoking. The study was published in the December issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology. More information Learn more about macular degeneration from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. healthday kalip
  9. Eggs and cholesterol: Is industry funded research misleading? Whether dietary cholesterol increases levels of cholesterol in the blood is a controversial topic. Although many researchers have investigated this question, a recent review asks whether industry funding has slanted the overall results. Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is essential for good health as it is an important structural component of cell walls. Our liver can produce all of the cholesterol that we need, but we also consume it in animal products. As cholesterol circulates the body, it can cause problems. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, which people often refer to as "bad" cholesterol, increases the risk of atherosclerosis, which is the accumulation of fatty plaques on the walls of blood vessels. Atherosclerosis increases the risk of stroke, heart attack, and peripheral artery disease. As eggs are high in cholesterol, scientists have raised concerns that they might lead to elevated cholesterol levels in the blood if a person eats them in excess. To investigate this, scientists have carried out many studies over more than 50 years. To date, however, the findings have fallen short of conclusive. The egg industry's role Some experts are concerned that industry funded research is muddying the waters and skewing result As the authors of the recent review explain, "In recent years, the egg industry, working especially through [United States] federally administered programs, has funded studies investigating the effects of eggs on blood cholesterol concentrations." They continue: "[T]he potential for industry funding for research to influence nutrition policy decisions has become an important concern." The primary purpose of the current review was to understand whether the proportion of industry funded studies is growing. The researchers also wanted to see "whether study conclusions reflected their objective findings." In total, the researchers found 211 papers that met their criteria for review, and they published their results in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. The authors note that industry funding has increased significantly. In the 1950s and 1960s, there were no industry funded studies, but from 2010 to 2019, 60% of studies had industry backing. Misrepresenting findings Overall, more than 85% of the studies reported that eggs increased blood cholesterol. However, the findings showed that the authors of industry funded papers were more likely to downplay the significance of these results. In fact, 49% of industry funded papers reported conclusions that did not match their results, compared with 13% of the papers that had not received industry funding. As an example, in one study, the researchers asked college students to eat two eggs with breakfast for 5 days each week for 14 weeks. At the end of the study, the participants' average LDL cholesterol had increased by 15 milligrams per decilitre (mg/dl). To put this into perspective, LDL cholesterol should be under 100 mg/dl for a healthy adult. So, an increase from 100 mg/dl to 115 mg/dl is a 15% rise in LDL cholesterol. Although this seems to be a substantial rise, in this study, it did not reach statistical significance. In other words, there was more than a 5% chance that the increase could have occurred by chance. As a result, the authors of the study concluded that an "additional 400 mg/day of dietary cholesterol did not negatively impact blood lipids." Study author Dr. Neal Barnard explains that "t would have been appropriate for the investigators to report that the cholesterol increases associated with eggs could have been due to chance. Instead, they wrote that the increases did not happen at all. Similar conclusions were reported in more than half of industry funded studies." The authors write, "It is important to differentiate between the absence of a statistically significant difference and the absence of a difference." Influencing policy The findings of this review are particularly worrying because this line of research has the power to influence policy. In 2015, for instance, the U.S. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee wrote that "available evidence shows no appreciable relationship between consumption of dietary cholesterol and serum cholesterol." However, after reviewing the available evidence, in the final guidelines, they called for eating "as little dietary cholesterol as possible." According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 95 million adults over the age of 20 years have high cholesterol. Giving the public the right advice is of paramount importance. "In decades past, the egg industry played little or no role in cholesterol research, and the studies' conclusions clearly showed that eggs raise cholesterol," explains Dr. Barnard. "In recent years, the egg industry has sought to neutralise eggs' unhealthy image as a cholesterol-raising product by funding more studies and skewing the interpretation of the results." In particular, the authors identify the American Egg Board, which is a federally authorised, industry funded body. Their mission is "to increase demand for all U.S. eggs and egg products." Over the years, scientists have carried out a number of meta-analyses to assess the effect of egg consumption on levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood. As one example, a recent analysis that collated results from 28 studies concluded that eating eggs significantly increases both total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentrations. "The egg industry has mounted an intense effort to try to show that eggs do not adversely affect blood cholesterol levels. For years, faulty studies on the effects of eggs on cholesterol have duped the press, public, and policymakers to serve industry interests." Study author Dr. Neal Barnard https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ kalip
  10. Ultra-processed foods may raise the risk of type 2 diabetes Sugary drinks, packaged snacks, and ready-made meals all count as ultra-processed foods — that is, foods that contain a higher number of additives and last longer because of the added preservatives. New research suggests that these foods also raise the risk of type 2 diabetes. Sugary drinks, packaged snacks, and ready-made meals all count as ultra-processed foods — that is, foods that contain a higher number of additives and last longer because of the added preservatives. New research suggests that these foods also raise the risk of type 2 diabetes. Share on Pinterest Some packaged foods may be ultra-processed and raise the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to new research. Research has linked ultra-processed foods with conditions such as cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease, as well as with a higher risk of premature mortality. These foods are prevalent in Western diets, and the Western world has also seen a surge in the incidence of diabetes in recent decades. Are ultra-processed foods and type 2 diabetes linked? And if so, how? Bernard Srour, Ph.D., of the Epidemiology and Statistics Research Centre–University of Paris in France, and his team of researchers set out to answer this question. They did so by examining the dietary habits of more than 100,000 people. The results of their analysis appear in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Ultra-processed foods and diabetes Srour and team carried out a population-based prospective cohort study in which they included 104,707 adult participants who had participated in the French NutriNet-Santé study. Of these participants, 21,800 were men, and 82,907 were women. The NutriNet-Santé study spanned a decade, running from 2009 to 2019. The researchers collected data on the dietary intake of the participants using repeated 24 hour dietary records that asked them about their consumption of about 3,500 different foods. Using the NOVA classification system, the researchers classified the 3,500 food items according to their degree of processing. There were four categories: unprocessed/minimally processed foods, culinary ingredients, processed foods, and ultra-processed foods. The researchers used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, which they adjusted for the known risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as sociodemographic background, lifestyle, and medical history. Ultra-processed foods may raise risk Srour and colleagues found a consistent association between the absolute amount of ultra-processed food consumption, which they measured in grams per day, and the risk of type 2 diabetes. "In this large observational prospective study, a higher proportion of [ultra-processed foods] in the diet was associated with a higher risk of [type 2 diabetes]," conclude the authors. Srour and colleagues add: "Even though these results need to be confirmed in other populations and settings, they provide evidence to support efforts by public health authorities to recommend limiting [ultra-processed food] consumption." The researchers say that ultra-processed foods are a modifiable risk factor for type 2 diabetes. They also point to countries such as France and Brazil, whose public health authorities have already started encouraging the population to eat minimally processed foods and avoid ultra-processed ones as a precautionary measure. What might explain the link? The researchers did not single out one type of food or ingredient but instead looked at the cumulative effect of ultra-processed foods on type 2 diabetes risk. The authors recommend caution in interpreting the associations that they found. Most of the additives in ultra-processed foods "are likely to be neutral for long-term health, and some may even be beneficial," they write, giving antioxidants as an example. However, there are other compounds that recent studies in mice and in vitro have suggested may be harmful. For instance, "carrageenan, a thickening and stabilizing agent, [...] might contribute to the development of diabetes by impairing glucose tolerance, increasing insulin resistance, and inhibiting insulin signalling," write the authors. Nonetheless, they caution that more research in humans is necessary before drawing conclusions about the harms of such compounds. Chemicals such as phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA), which are often present in plastic packaging, may contaminate many ultra-processed foods. BPA and phthalates may disrupt endocrine function, and the authors note that some recent meta-analyses have shown that high concentrations of these compounds are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, research has associated metabolites that form as a result of high-temperature cooking — such as acrylamide and acrolein metabolites — with insulin resistance. "Finally, industrial partial oil hydrogenation may lead to the creation of trans unsaturated fatty acids in products containing hydrogenated oils," mention the authors. "Although still debated, trans fats were linked to increased risks of heart disease and [type 2 diabetes]," they note. Nevertheless, Srour and team conclude: "Additional research is needed to understand the biological mechanisms underlying the present observations." https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ kalip
  11. Black Patients May Not Gain Heart Benefit From Low-Dose Aspirin The daily use of low-dose aspirin against heart disease may have taken another knock. New research shows that the practice may not provide black Americans with any lowering of their heart attack risk. Researchers analysed 11 years of data from more than 65,000 people, ages 40-79, living in the American Southeast. More than two-thirds of the participants were black, and about two-thirds were at high risk for heart attack or stroke at the start of the study period. Taking low-dose aspirin was associated with a reduced risk of a fatal heart attack in whites, particularly in white women, but it did not appear to lower the risk among blacks, even among those with the highest risk of heart disease, the research found. The reasons for the "race gap" in aspirin effectiveness are unclear, but "we think the reason aspirin use did not have a beneficial effect for African Americans could involve a different genetic response to aspirin therapy and poor control of other risk factors," said study lead author Dr. Rodrigo Fernandez-Jimenez. He's a cardiologist and researcher at National Centre for Cardiovascular Research in Madrid, Spain. The researchers stressed that the study wasn't designed to prove cause and effect, only showing associations between aspirin use and heart health. The findings were published Dec. 11 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. While millions of aging Americans take a daily low-dose (81 milligrams) aspirin in hopes of reducing their odds for heart attack and cancer, new data has emerged casting the practice in doubt. In fact, earlier this year, the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology issued a joint statement that -- at least in older people at low risk for heart disease -- daily aspirin use was probably not worth it, given the added risk for bleeding tied to the drug. Dr. Benjamin Hirsh directs preventive cardiology at Northwell Health's Sandra Atlas Bass Heart Hospital in Manhasset, N.Y. He reviewed the study and agreed that "physicians are accustomed to prescribing aspirin to patients with lower risk of heart disease, but the findings of this study and others are changing this practice." Also, most of the previous research on aspirin's usefulness against heart trouble was based on data from white patients, Fernandez-Jimenez noted. "Most available data shows that African Americans have a higher risk of having a heart attack, stroke or other heart diseases compared to whites; however, previous studies didn't include enough black participants to determine if taking a low-dose aspirin for primary prevention of heart disease was useful for this group of people," he said in a journal news release. Dr. Satjit Bhusri is a cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. He stressed that aspirin is still being recommended for people at high risk of a heart attack, such as those who've already had an attack. So why didn't that benefit seem to extend to black patients? "There may be an underlying genetic, compliance or socioeconomic play here," said Bhusri, who wasn't involved in the new study. In the meantime, informed decisions as to who is "high-risk," regardless of race, are easily made, Hirsh said. "We now have multiple tools including imaging scans, such as coronary calcium scores, which help identify individual risk to guide the recommendation for aspirin," Hirsh explained. "We need to individualise our patients' risk of heart disease in order to determine who will be most likely to benefit from aspirin." That's in keeping with American Heart Association guidelines, which now advise that decisions about aspirin use must be based on a patient's specific health status, in consultation with their physician. More information The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on heart disease prevention. https://consumer.healthday.com/ kalip
  12. Stroke: Excessive sleep may raise risk by 85% Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide and in the United States, specifically. New research finds that excessive sleep considerably raises the risk of this cardiovascular problem. Share on Pinterest New research suggests that people who take long naps in the day may be at a higher risk of stroke. Globally, 15 million Trusted Source people experience a stroke each year. Almost 6 million of these people die as a result, and 5 million go on to live with a disability. In the U.S., over 795,000 Trusted Source people have a stroke each year. The list of traditional risk factors Trusted Source for stroke is long, ranging from elements of lifestyle, including smoking, to pre-existing conditions, such as diabetes. More recently, researchers have started exploring sleep duration as another potential risk factor. Some studies Trusted Source have found that either too much or too little sleep can increase the risk of cardiovascular events, including stroke. According to these findings, regular sleep deprivation and sleep for more than 7 hours per night are each associated with a higher risk of stroke. Now, a study appearing in the journal Neurology finds an association between daytime naps, excessive sleep, and stroke risk. Dr. Xiaomin Zhang, from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, in Wuhan, China, is the corresponding author of the paper that details this study. 85% higher risk in long sleepers, nappers Dr. Zhang and the team collected information from 31,750 people in China. None of the participants — who were 62 years old, on average — had a history of stroke or any other serious health condition at the start of the study. The participants answered questions about their sleeping patterns and napping habits, and the researchers clinically followed the group for an average of 6 years.The team found that 8% of the participants were in the habit of taking naps that lasted longer than 90 minutes, and 24% reported sleeping for at least 9 hours each night. Over the study period, there were 1,557 strokes among the participants. Those who slept for 9 or more hours per night were 23% more likely to experience a stroke than those who regularly slept only 7–8 hours each night. People who got less than 7 hours of shuteye or 8–9 hours had no higher risk of stroke than those who slept 7–8 hours. Importantly, people who both slept for longer than 9 hours and napped for more than 90 minutes per day had an 85% higher risk of stroke than those who slept and napped moderately. Finally, sleep quality seemed to play a role — people who reported poor sleep quality were 29% more likely to have a stroke than those whose sleep quality was reportedly good.These results continued to be significant after adjusting for potential confounders, such as hypertension, diabetes, and smoking. "These results highlight the importance of moderate napping and sleeping duration and maintaining good sleep quality, especially in middle-age and older adults." Dr. Xiaomin Zhang Study limitations and potential mechanisms The researchers acknowledge some limitations to their work, as well as the fact that more research is necessary. First, because the study was observational, it cannot prove causality. Second, the research did not account for sleep apnoea or other sleep disorders that may have influenced the results.Third, self-reported data is not as reliable as data recorded by researchers who observe participants' sleep. Finally, the results may only apply to older, healthy Chinese adults and not to other populations. "More research is needed to understand how taking long naps and sleeping longer hours at night may be tied to an increased risk of stroke, but previous studies have shown that long nappers and sleepers have unfavourable changes in their cholesterol levels and increased waist circumferences, both of which are risk factors for stroke," explains Dr. Zhang."In addition, long napping and sleeping may suggest an overall inactive lifestyle, which is also related to increased risk of stroke." https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ kalip
  13. What to know about CoQ10 and its dosage? Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, is a naturally occurring chemical that exists in almost every cell of the human body. CoQ10 carries out several vital roles, including promoting energy production and neutralising harmful particles called free radicals. A deficiency in CoQ10 can adversely affect a person's health. People can get CoQ10 through foods and supplements. In this article, we discuss the benefits, side effects, and recommended dosages of CoQ10. What is CoQ10? Coenzyme Q10, or CoQ10, is a naturally occurring chemical that exists in almost every cell of the human body. CoQ10 carries out several vital roles, including promoting energy production and neutralising harmful particles called free radicals. A deficiency in CoQ10 can adversely affect a person's health. People can get CoQ10 through foods and supplements. In this article, we discuss the benefits, side effects, and recommended dosages of CoQ10. What is the correct dosage? The exact recommended dose of CoQ10 will vary according to the following factors: • a person's age • a person's health • the condition receiving treatment Standard daily doses of CoQ10 Trusted Source range from 60 milligrams (mg) to 500 mg. The highest recommended dose is 1,200 mg. However, clinical trials have used dosages as high as 3,000 mg per day. Different types of CoQ10 supplements may also require different dosages. Most supplements contain the inactive form of CoQ10, ubiquinone, which is harder to absorb than ubiquinol. A 2018 randomised trial compared the effects of 200 mg daily doses of ubiquinone and ubiquinol supplements on CoQ10 levels in older men. Ubiquinol supplementation led to a 1.5-fold increase in the amount of CoQ10 in the blood. Supplements containing ubiquinone did not have a significant effect on CoQ10 levels. Benefits of CoQ10 CoQ10 protects cells against oxidative damage. It also plays a vital role in producing the body's primary source of energy, ATP. CoQ10 could, therefore, provide a range of health benefits. Some examples include: Improving heart health The heart contains some of the highest concentrations of CoQ10 in the body. The vast majority of people with heart disease also have low CoQ10 levels. Researchers Trusted Source now consider low CoQ10 levels to be an indicator of the severity and long-term outcome of various heart diseases. In one 2018 pilot study Trusted Source, ten children with cardiac muscle dysfunction received 110–700 mg of liquid ubiquinol per day. At weeks 12 and 24 of treatment, the children had significantly higher CoQ10 plasma levels and improved heart function. Reducing muscle pain from statin use Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an umbrella term for conditions that affect the heart or blood vessels. Doctors often prescribe statins to treat CVD. These drugs work by reducing the cholesterol production that can contribute to the disease. Although statins reduce cholesterol production, they also lower CoQ10 levels. Reduced CoQ10 levels can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, which can cause muscle pain Trusted Source, or myopathy. CoQ10 supplements may help relieve muscle pain related to statin use. A 2019 randomised controlled trial Trusted Source investigated the effect of CoQ10 on statin-related muscle pain. The study involved 60 participants who had previously reported muscle pain while taking statins. Over 3 months, each participant received daily doses of either 100mg of CoQ10 supplement or a placebo. The participants who took the CoQ10 supplements had significantly reduced statin-related muscle pain. Those who received the placebo reported no change in muscle pain. However, the authors of a 2015 meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy of CoQ10 supplementation for treating statin-related muscle pain. The meta-analysis included six studies with a combined total of 302 patients. The authors found no evidence that CoQ10 significantly improves statin-related muscle pain. Further large-scale RCTs are necessary to determine whether CoQ10 is a viable treatment for people experiencing statin-related muscle pain. Treating migraines Chronic migraines may be due to inflammation of neurons and cells in a part of the brain called the trigeminovascular system. A 2018 clinical trial investigated whether coQ10 supplements could reduce inflammation in 45 women with episodic migraines. The women took 400 mg daily doses of either a CoQ10 supplement or a placebo. The women who took the CoQ10 supplements had fewer and less intense migraines when compared to the placebo group. Women who took the CoQ10 supplements also showed lower levels of certain inflammatory biomarkers. Inflammatory biomarkers are substances in the blood that indicate the presence of inflammation somewhere in the body. A 2018 meta-analysis re-examined five studies investigating the use of CoQ10 supplements for migraines. The meta-analysis concluded that CoQ10 is more effective than a placebo at reducing the duration of migraines. However, CoQ10 did not appear to affect migraine severity or frequency. Protecting against age-related diseases Mitochondrial function decreases as the body's CoQ10 levels naturally deplete with age. Research Trusted Source suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction can contribute to age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These diseases are associated with free radical damage. A 2015 study investigated the effect of a Mediterranean diet combined with CoQ10 supplementation on metabolism in elderly adults. This combination led to an increase in antioxidant biomarkers in the urine. The authors concluded that taking CoQ10 and eating a diet low in saturated fat may help protect against diseases caused by free radical damage. In another 2015 study Trusted Source, older adults received CoQ10 and selenium supplements for 48 months. The participants reported improvements in vitality, physical performance, and overall quality of life. Risks of too much CoQ10 CoQ10 supplements appear to be safe, and most people tolerate them even at high doses. However, CoQ10 supplements can cause the following side effects: • nausea • stomach pain • heartburn • headache • dizziness • fatigue • light sensitivity • insomnia • skin rash CoQ10 supplements may interfere with certain medications, including: • blood-thinners, such as warfarin • insulin • some types of chemotherapy medication People should consult a doctor before taking any new medications or dietary supplements, including CoQ10. Summary CoQ10 is an antioxidant that exists in almost every cell of the human body. CoQ10 deficiency is associated with various medical conditions, such as heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease. Although the body naturally produces CoQ10, some people may benefit from taking supplements. Overall, CoQ10 supplements appear relatively safe and cause few side effects. Supplements are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for purity or verified for labeling accuracy, so purchase only those products that have been tested by an independent lab. People who are interested in trying CoQ10 supplements may want to consult a healthcare professional first. Experts do not recommend CoQ10 for people taking blood-thinning medications, insulin, or certain chemotherapy drugs. CoQ10 is available in some drug stores, pharmacies, and online. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/ kalip
  14. Low-Dose Aspirin Might Cut Cancer Risk Daily low-dose aspirin might reduce your risk of dying from cancer, particularly if you've packed on a few extra pounds, researchers say. Taking aspirin three or more times a week is associated with a lower risk of cancer death as well as death for any reason, a new study report. Aspirin's protective effect appears particularly pronounced among people who are overweight -- those with a body mass index of 25 to 29.9, the results show. Low-dose aspirin reduced overall cancer death risk by 15% and all-cause death by 19% among more than 146,000 people who participated in a cancer screening trial conducted between 1993 and 2008, the study authors said. Overweight folks also experienced a marked decline in their risk of death from gastrointestinal cancer (28%) and colon cancer (34%). "Our primary focus was really on colorectal cancer deaths, since there's a lot of evidence to suggest that aspirin use may lower risk of gastrointestinal deaths," said lead researcher Holli Loomans-Kropp, a cancer prevention fellow with the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The study results support the standing recommendation of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which says people 50 to 59 should take low-dose aspirin to prevent colon cancer if they're not at increased risk for bleeding. Daily aspirin use as a preventive health measure has become controversial over the past few years, however. In March, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association changed their guidelines to restrict low-dose aspirin use to people at high risk for heart disease or stroke. The two groups argued that the bleeding risk from aspirin outweighed the heart benefits for healthy people. The USPSTF continues to recommend low-dose aspirin for middle-aged people for heart health, if they have a 10% or greater chance of developing heart disease within the next decade. The new study involved a re-analysis of data gathered during the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, which was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. No one knows why aspirin might have this protective effect, but Loomans-Kropp said evidence points toward its anti-inflammatory action. "Gastrointestinal cancers are highly inflammation-associated cancers, and where the strongest effect has been is with the gastrointestinal cancers," Loomans-Kropp said. It's also possible that aspirin's blood-thinning effect might play a role, said Eric Jacobs, senior scientific director of epidemiology research at the American Cancer Society. "Aspirin may help prevent cancer the same way that it helps prevent heart attacks, which is by blocking the activation of blood platelet cells," Jacobs said. "We know that activated platelets can release factors that help tumours grow, and activated platelets may also help cancers spread throughout the body." People worried about colon cancer should talk with their doctor about getting screened for the disease, since a colonoscopy can remove polyps before they can develop into cancer, Jacobs said. "Aspirin use is not the only way or the best way to lower risk of colorectal cancer," Jacobs said, adding that maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, quitting smoking and eating less red meat also can help reduce your risk. Anyone thinking about taking daily aspirin should discuss it with their doctor first, said Dr. Merry Jennifer Markham, a spokesperson for the American Society of Clinical Oncology and a cancer doctor with the University of Florida. "It's important to have a discussion with the physician about whether the benefits of regular aspirin use outweigh the harms," Markham said. "I don't believe this is a one-size-fits-all approach, and must be individualized based on the individual person's other health issues and bleeding risks." The new study was published online Dec. 4 in JAMA Network Open. https://consumer.healthday.com/ kalip
  15. Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium onion (chopped) 2 large stalks celery(chopped) 4 cloves garlic (pressed) 1 red medium bell pepper (chopped) 1 cup carrot (chopped or chopped pumpkin if available) 1 heaping tablespoon sweet paprika 3 teaspoons turmeric 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon hot sauce 450 grams can tomatoes (chopped) 5 cups vegetable stock 280 grams green beans (frozen or fresh) 1 large leaf chard (cut into thin strips, or spinach or kale) Preparation In a large soup pot, simmer oil, onion, and celery. Cook over low heat for 5 to 10 minutes to develop more sweetness in the onion. Add garlic and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Turn up the heat to medium and add the peppers and carrots. Cook another 1 to 2 minutes and add the spices. Stir and cook until fragrant—another minute or so. Add tomatoes and stock, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add beans and chard and simmer for another 5 minutes or until the beans are cooked. (If using cooked cubed meat such as chicken or turkey, add at this time.) Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper as needed. https://www.verywellfit.com/ kalip
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